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Managing Water Resources in a Low-to-No-Snow Future

A new Berkeley Lab analysis finds that if greenhouse gas emissions continue along the high-emissions scenario, low-to-no-snow winters will become a regular occurrence in the western U.S. in 35 to 60 years.

Berkeley Lab Mobilizes to Predict How Caldor Fire May Lead to Floods and Land Movement

After the Caldor Fire erupted in August 2021, scientists from Berkeley Lab launched a research project to study how the fire would affect the mountain ecosystem, including factors such as streamflow, groundwater levels, water quality, and possible soil erosion leading to floods and debris flow. They mobilized to burn areas to collect samples of water, sediment, and ash.

Two Berkeley Lab Scientists Appointed to President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology

Astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter and climate scientist Inez Fung, both scientists at Berkeley Lab, have been appointed to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), the White House announced today.

Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm visits Berkeley Lab

U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm visited the Bay Area on Friday, Aug. 20, making a two-hour stop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for discussions with Lab scientists and leaders and tours of two of the Lab’s five national scientific user facilities.

Latest IPCC Report Points to Urgent Need to Cut Emissions

Our planet’s oceans, forests, and soils perform a valuable service, absorbing half of our carbon dioxide emissions. But the more that our planet warms, the more that these so-called “carbon sinks” weaken in their ability to perform this service. If we continue on our current trajectory of high emissions of greenhouse gases, by the next century not only will oceans and forests absorb less carbon dioxide, they could even reverse their role and become carbon sources.

Deep Forest Soils Lose Carbon as Temperatures Climb

A new study led by Berkeley Lab has provided the first physical evidence that warmer temperatures lead to a significant drop in the stored carbon stock in deep forest soils. An experiment in California’s Sierra Nevada forest found that the carbon content in subsoils dropped 33% over five years. The research team, led by Margaret

The Future Looks Bright for Infinitely Recyclable Plastic

Plastics are ubiquitous, but they’re not practical. Less than 10% are recycled, and the other ~8 billion tons are creating a pollution crisis. A Berkeley Lab team is determined to change that. A new analysis shows producing and recycling their game-changing new plastic could be easy and cheap enough to leave old plastics in the dust.

In Calculating the Social Cost of Methane, Equity Matters

A new study by a team including researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley reports that the social cost of methane – a greenhouse gas that is 30 times as potent as carbon dioxide in its ability to trap heat – varies by as much as an order of magnitude between industrialized and developing regions of the world.

From Smoky Skies to a Green Horizon: Scientists Convert Fire-Risk Wood into Biofuel

Scientists from Berkeley Lab and Sandia National Laboratories have collaborated to develop a streamlined and efficient process for converting woody plant matter like forest overgrowth and agricultural waste – material that is currently burned either intentionally or unintentionally – into liquid biofuel.

U.S. Power Sector is Halfway to Zero Carbon Emissions

New research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory analyzes historical trends to examine how much progress the power sector has already made in reducing emissions. It found that the U.S. cut power sector emissions by 52% below projected levels, or halfway to zero carbon emissions by 2050.